Don’t buy at the wrong time

This chart below (and commentary) shows you when you should be buying Aluminium or associated proxies (such as Alcoa) and the power of operational leverage that a corporation can provide shareholders.

The blue line is the rolling 200 week moving average.

Gravity does exist.

While the theme of “having industrial capacity in moments of output gaps” remains intact, at this moment, it is a sellers market.

Beware of chasing the bullish (metals and energy) commodity prices higher.

It’s also the start of an odd period where higher prices of finished goods (due to the higher price paid by buyers of raw/base/industrial commodities) may be left on the shelf.

Rising prices have been evident but we can’t assume that higher prices are automatically paid for.

February 18, 2022

by Rob Zdravevski

rob@karriasset.com.au

Commodities are peaking

The Thomson Reuters (core commodity) CRB Index hits its highest level since November 2014.

Weightings are particularly heavy towards energy and agricultural contracts.

The CRB is a whisker away from the target mentioned in this story written a few days ago, while the AUDUSD has hit my target of 0.7135.

This is part of my call of a peak for broader commodity prices.

Just take a look around the prices of Oil, Gasoline, Heating Oil, Corn, Wheat, Coffee, Cattle, Oats etc etc.

Also, the price action in Crude Oil is suggesting the recent run is waning.

#meanreversion

In turn, I am not owning any related equities across Oil & Gas, Bulk producers of grains and even miners of raw industrial/base metals.

It’s as good as it’s going to get for in this current wave.

So, what else to do…..

Well, I’ll wait…..

then I’ll watch the stock prices of companies who buy these raw commodities such as Kellogg, Starbucks, Kraft Heinz, Nestle, Nucor or Nippon Steel, as their input costs will fall, thus improving their margins.

…….also, the unloved precious metals are worthy of some attention, while the AUD/USD isn’t acting very constructively.

To many, it might seem perverse to Buy USD (and sell your AUD 0.7130) but that is what the market is telling me.

I’m also seeing divergences in currency correlations.

Take a look at the chart below showing the AUDUSD laid over the CRB Index and then the other is the price of BHP over the same currency cross.

I believe currency before I believe the equity.

For extra kicks, I’ve thrown a chart showing the price of Woodside Energy mimicking the CRB Index.

February 3, 2022

by Rob Zdravevski

rob@karriasset.com.au

The Case for Higher Equities, a Stronger USD and Weaker Commodities


The US 10’s are yielding 1.33% and the Aussie 10’s are 1.20%.

That spread (difference) between the US 10 Government Bond Yield and the Australian 10 Year equivalent is currently 0.13%.

But the figure doesn’t really matter, it’s the direction of the trend which is of greater importance.

As we see today………a rising trend (and when coupled with a break above a trend line) portends greener pastures for equity prices.

Below you will find a ‘close-up’ of a Weekly chart, highlighting the current ‘break-out’, while the 40 year chart (on a Monthly basis) illustrates a rising trend (of the spread) equating to an advancing S&P 500 (SPX), while a decline trend results in a lower or sideways travel.

A rising trend in this interest rate differential tend to also equate to a stronger US Dollar, which in turn means a weaker AUD.

Which…..also correlates to weaker commodity prices.

This is an indicator worth watching for your macro and longer term positioning.

Who would think we’d see a stronger US Dollar?

Rising yields on U.S. Treasuries will prolong the advance in the Dollar.

And rising interest rates add to debt servicing stress which can lead to Sovereign Debt pressure (there is no use calling it a crisis, until it becomes one) at which point the U.S. Dollar remains the currency of ‘last resort’.

This can lead to more buying of the U.S. Dollar.

See how this scenario can develop?

August 11, 2021

by Rob Zdravevski

rob@karriasset.com.au

The Delicate Game of Interest Rates & Inflation

Brazil lifts interest rates by 1% to 5.25%. It’s seen as its most aggressive move since 2016.

2 weeks ago, Russia, (another commodity reliant economy) hiked rates too.

It looks like both central banks are trying to curb inflationary pressures. Rising commodity prices are a notable contributor.

Invariably, rising inflation will send government bond yields higher.

Why are the central banks in other commodity sensitive economies such as Australia and Canada still holding interest rates around the 0.50% mark?

Are the Bank of Canada and the Reserve Bank of Australia foolishly towing the same line as other Western economies?

The British, German and French economies are vastly different.

This may turn out to be a perilous policy error.

Are the BOC and RBA not entirely politically independent?

Can it be that the Russian Central Bank is acting for the good of the economy and citizens or is it because Putin doesn’t need to worry about being re-elected and Scott Morrison does?

Or perhaps it’s because the Household Debt to GDP for Russian’s and Brazilians is 22% and 37% respectively,

while in Canada it’s 113% and Australia’s is a world topping 123% ????

August 6, 2021

by Rob Zdravevski

rob@karriasset.com.au

Russia aggressively hikes interest rates

I found this news interesting.

https://www.reuters.com/business/finance/russia-raises-key-rate-65-sharpest-move-since-2014-2021-07-23/


Is the world’s 11th largest economy ahead of the curve and crowd when it comes to managing inflation or does its strengthening currency hinder growth and exports?

Incidentally, South Korea and Australia are ranked 12th and 13th

Corn is finding a floor

Corn prices have retraced an exact 50% of the rally which commenced in August 2020.

In the past few months, I have been writing about parabolic price moves and highlighting the risk of ‘going long’ at what seems the tail end of an advance which sometimes can resemble chasing a mania.

Albeit Corn is currently in a downtrend, my other indicators suggest that the strength of the decline is dubious. If Corn shoots below the 50% retracement mark, it should stop at the 50 Week Moving Average of $4.99.

That’s only a further 5.6%, following an already 28% decline from its $7.35 peak in mid-May.

Let’s not try and squeeze out the last kernel?

Perhaps it’s time to sell my equity holdings in Gruma (the tortilla and taco maker) and Kellogg. Their input prices may start rising again.

July 12, 2021
by Rob Zdravevski
rob@karriasset.com.au

Lumber’s decline accelerates

The price of Lumber has fallen 24% in the past 4 days, when I last mentioned its action in a topic relating to its moving averages.

Incidentally, last night decline now sees Lumber trading simultaneously at both its 50 Week Moving Average and its 200 Day Moving Average.

It is now the same price as seen in August 2000 and most recently as January 2021.

Its price has now sunk 52% in the past 5 weeks.

#meanreversion

June 18, 2021
by Rob Zdravevski
rob@karriasset.com.au

2nd chance to buy coffee

Coffee didn’t quite trade down to the $1.06 buy price I was looking for, as per my July 31, 2020 note. (see link below)

Instead, it carried on higher from the $1.15 level mentioned, towards a $1.34 high.

The chart below shows a trend line it hugged and held, until it didn’t.

A trader protecting their position may have placed a stop loss order about 1 cent below that trend line.

The long term supply disruption theme remains intact, however the short term gyrations have seen it trade back to its 200 day moving average albeit its not yet oversold.

I may have a second chance to buy coffee around the $1.05 level, but I’ll watch it closely for the velocity of the decline and whether it holds recent lows.

https://lnkd.in/eSrBa-i

September 29, 2020
by Rob Zdravevski
rob@karriasset.com.au

Iron Ore – As Good As It Gets

June 23, 2020

by Rob Zdravevski
Iron Ore – As Good As It Gets ?

Over the past 6 weeks, the price of 62% grade Iron Ore has risen 25%. It’s now trading around $102.

Prices have risen due to a combination of China’s factories and manufacturing returning to a “normalised” utilisation and Brazil shipping less ore.

The previous spike, in January 2019, saw Iron Ore price climb from $75 to $95 within 2 weeks and a subsequent surge to $125 occurred over the next 3 months.

This was mainly due to the collapse of a tailings dam in Brumadinho (owned by VALE), which also tragically resulted in lives being lost.

I can’t quite reason about the cause of the 2nd lurch higher as economies were at the tail-end of a 7-8 year economic cycle.

However, the price normalised back to over the next 4 months as Australian suppliers filled the gap.

<see chart below>

Today, the price of Iron Ore has risen again due to a Brazilian supply disruption aided by “newer news” that Brazil’s COVID-19 environment is worsening.

Once again, Australian iron ore miners seized the supply opportunity yet prices have continued to roar ahead.

It is at this point in time, that I now think, that this is as “good as it gets” for the Iron Ore price.

But I also have the following questions;

  • Can Brazil contractually sell Iron Ore to China below prices as seen in the spot and futures markets?
  • Is it true that Brazil produces a higher grade of Iron Ore than Australia?
  • Will Brazil’s cheaper labour and production give them an advantage?

If the answer to these 3 questions is “Yes”, they then qualify for two of the three “cheaper, better and faster” categories.

Brazil could also be “faster” getting ore to the port, although overall we need to keep in mind that it does take 45 days to ship Brazilian Iron Ore to China when compared to the 12 day journey for Australian suppliers.

Anecdotally, I can’t help speculate that Brazil is feeling the strain of lower export receipts and may start to push product through its ports with less hesitation.

Inversely, it’s naive to think that China’s importers are submissive “price-takers” of sensitively priced commodities.

And so, my analysis of the price action in the Singapore traded 62% TSI contract suggests the strength of the advance is waning, as it makes a “rounding top” of lower highs and lower lows, a change in trend is near and the price traded to extremes on various measures.

The “fat part of the trade” has been seen and I expect it to retrace and trade down to $92.

For those who disagree, I am curious what you think will “drive” the price higher from here and how much risk are you taken when compared to the reward on offer when looking at the whole picture?
Until next time,

Rob
Subscribe to my blog: www.robzdravevski.com

Drop me an email: rob@karriasset.com.au

Disclaimer

 

Some extra reading.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-12/iron-ore-price-explainer-after-mining-dam-collapse/10800698?nw=0

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brumadinho_dam_disaster

If you’d like to have a chat to me about some of our best stock ideas for your portfolio, feel free to call me on 0438 921 403.

Rob Zdravevski is the proprietor of Karri Asset Advisors, a specialist in the provision of investment advice and equity recommendations for clients’ portfolios.

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