The Case for Higher Equities, a Stronger USD and Weaker Commodities


The US 10’s are yielding 1.33% and the Aussie 10’s are 1.20%.

That spread (difference) between the US 10 Government Bond Yield and the Australian 10 Year equivalent is currently 0.13%.

But the figure doesn’t really matter, it’s the direction of the trend which is of greater importance.

As we see today………a rising trend (and when coupled with a break above a trend line) portends greener pastures for equity prices.

Below you will find a ‘close-up’ of a Weekly chart, highlighting the current ‘break-out’, while the 40 year chart (on a Monthly basis) illustrates a rising trend (of the spread) equating to an advancing S&P 500 (SPX), while a decline trend results in a lower or sideways travel.

A rising trend in this interest rate differential tend to also equate to a stronger US Dollar, which in turn means a weaker AUD.

Which…..also correlates to weaker commodity prices.

This is an indicator worth watching for your macro and longer term positioning.

Who would think we’d see a stronger US Dollar?

Rising yields on U.S. Treasuries will prolong the advance in the Dollar.

And rising interest rates add to debt servicing stress which can lead to Sovereign Debt pressure (there is no use calling it a crisis, until it becomes one) at which point the U.S. Dollar remains the currency of ‘last resort’.

This can lead to more buying of the U.S. Dollar.

See how this scenario can develop?

August 11, 2021

by Rob Zdravevski

rob@karriasset.com.au

The Delicate Game of Interest Rates & Inflation

Brazil lifts interest rates by 1% to 5.25%. It’s seen as its most aggressive move since 2016.

2 weeks ago, Russia, (another commodity reliant economy) hiked rates too.

It looks like both central banks are trying to curb inflationary pressures. Rising commodity prices are a notable contributor.

Invariably, rising inflation will send government bond yields higher.

Why are the central banks in other commodity sensitive economies such as Australia and Canada still holding interest rates around the 0.50% mark?

Are the Bank of Canada and the Reserve Bank of Australia foolishly towing the same line as other Western economies?

The British, German and French economies are vastly different.

This may turn out to be a perilous policy error.

Are the BOC and RBA not entirely politically independent?

Can it be that the Russian Central Bank is acting for the good of the economy and citizens or is it because Putin doesn’t need to worry about being re-elected and Scott Morrison does?

Or perhaps it’s because the Household Debt to GDP for Russian’s and Brazilians is 22% and 37% respectively,

while in Canada it’s 113% and Australia’s is a world topping 123% ????

August 6, 2021

by Rob Zdravevski

rob@karriasset.com.au

Russia aggressively hikes interest rates

I found this news interesting.

https://www.reuters.com/business/finance/russia-raises-key-rate-65-sharpest-move-since-2014-2021-07-23/


Is the world’s 11th largest economy ahead of the curve and crowd when it comes to managing inflation or does its strengthening currency hinder growth and exports?

Incidentally, South Korea and Australia are ranked 12th and 13th

Corn is finding a floor

Corn prices have retraced an exact 50% of the rally which commenced in August 2020.

In the past few months, I have been writing about parabolic price moves and highlighting the risk of ‘going long’ at what seems the tail end of an advance which sometimes can resemble chasing a mania.

Albeit Corn is currently in a downtrend, my other indicators suggest that the strength of the decline is dubious. If Corn shoots below the 50% retracement mark, it should stop at the 50 Week Moving Average of $4.99.

That’s only a further 5.6%, following an already 28% decline from its $7.35 peak in mid-May.

Let’s not try and squeeze out the last kernel?

Perhaps it’s time to sell my equity holdings in Gruma (the tortilla and taco maker) and Kellogg. Their input prices may start rising again.

July 12, 2021
by Rob Zdravevski
rob@karriasset.com.au

Lumber’s decline accelerates

The price of Lumber has fallen 24% in the past 4 days, when I last mentioned its action in a topic relating to its moving averages.

Incidentally, last night decline now sees Lumber trading simultaneously at both its 50 Week Moving Average and its 200 Day Moving Average.

It is now the same price as seen in August 2000 and most recently as January 2021.

Its price has now sunk 52% in the past 5 weeks.

#meanreversion

June 18, 2021
by Rob Zdravevski
rob@karriasset.com.au

2nd chance to buy coffee

Coffee didn’t quite trade down to the $1.06 buy price I was looking for, as per my July 31, 2020 note. (see link below)

Instead, it carried on higher from the $1.15 level mentioned, towards a $1.34 high.

The chart below shows a trend line it hugged and held, until it didn’t.

A trader protecting their position may have placed a stop loss order about 1 cent below that trend line.

The long term supply disruption theme remains intact, however the short term gyrations have seen it trade back to its 200 day moving average albeit its not yet oversold.

I may have a second chance to buy coffee around the $1.05 level, but I’ll watch it closely for the velocity of the decline and whether it holds recent lows.

https://lnkd.in/eSrBa-i

September 29, 2020
by Rob Zdravevski
rob@karriasset.com.au

Iron Ore – As Good As It Gets

June 23, 2020

by Rob Zdravevski
Iron Ore – As Good As It Gets ?

Over the past 6 weeks, the price of 62% grade Iron Ore has risen 25%. It’s now trading around $102.

Prices have risen due to a combination of China’s factories and manufacturing returning to a “normalised” utilisation and Brazil shipping less ore.

The previous spike, in January 2019, saw Iron Ore price climb from $75 to $95 within 2 weeks and a subsequent surge to $125 occurred over the next 3 months.

This was mainly due to the collapse of a tailings dam in Brumadinho (owned by VALE), which also tragically resulted in lives being lost.

I can’t quite reason about the cause of the 2nd lurch higher as economies were at the tail-end of a 7-8 year economic cycle.

However, the price normalised back to over the next 4 months as Australian suppliers filled the gap.

<see chart below>

Today, the price of Iron Ore has risen again due to a Brazilian supply disruption aided by “newer news” that Brazil’s COVID-19 environment is worsening.

Once again, Australian iron ore miners seized the supply opportunity yet prices have continued to roar ahead.

It is at this point in time, that I now think, that this is as “good as it gets” for the Iron Ore price.

But I also have the following questions;

  • Can Brazil contractually sell Iron Ore to China below prices as seen in the spot and futures markets?
  • Is it true that Brazil produces a higher grade of Iron Ore than Australia?
  • Will Brazil’s cheaper labour and production give them an advantage?

If the answer to these 3 questions is “Yes”, they then qualify for two of the three “cheaper, better and faster” categories.

Brazil could also be “faster” getting ore to the port, although overall we need to keep in mind that it does take 45 days to ship Brazilian Iron Ore to China when compared to the 12 day journey for Australian suppliers.

Anecdotally, I can’t help speculate that Brazil is feeling the strain of lower export receipts and may start to push product through its ports with less hesitation.

Inversely, it’s naive to think that China’s importers are submissive “price-takers” of sensitively priced commodities.

And so, my analysis of the price action in the Singapore traded 62% TSI contract suggests the strength of the advance is waning, as it makes a “rounding top” of lower highs and lower lows, a change in trend is near and the price traded to extremes on various measures.

The “fat part of the trade” has been seen and I expect it to retrace and trade down to $92.

For those who disagree, I am curious what you think will “drive” the price higher from here and how much risk are you taken when compared to the reward on offer when looking at the whole picture?
Until next time,

Rob
Subscribe to my blog: www.robzdravevski.com

Drop me an email: rob@karriasset.com.au

Disclaimer

 

Some extra reading.

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-02-12/iron-ore-price-explainer-after-mining-dam-collapse/10800698?nw=0

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brumadinho_dam_disaster

If you’d like to have a chat to me about some of our best stock ideas for your portfolio, feel free to call me on 0438 921 403.

Rob Zdravevski is the proprietor of Karri Asset Advisors, a specialist in the provision of investment advice and equity recommendations for clients’ portfolios.

Lithium stocks to release some steam

Lithium darling, Pilbara Minerals (PLS:ASX) looks like heading down to the 80 cents level

Iron Ore Gravy Trains

Once upon a time mining companies were making a lot of money by extracting ore from Australia’s crust.

Soon after, the government needed some money to pay for the debts they incurred as a result of the spending promises they made to the Australian public, in their attempt to remain elected to power.

They thought that they could invent a tax which charged mining companies for how much resources that they dig up and sell.

The tax was created. Some were happy and others weren’t. They was lobbying, protests, crying and demanding. The tax had a short life. The new government had mates in the mining sector. The tax was no longer alive.

It was OK ’cause the government still earned some sort of money from whatever businesses the large mining companies conducted, providing that they didn’t cleverly use their offshore subsidiaries to move around and book profits into.

The price of coal had already fallen, but nobody likes them anyway ’cause their industry is a visibly polluting one.

But oh oh – recently the price of Iron Ore has fallen.

This is how I see it,

Government let off the iron ore miners off the hook with the mining tax, less money for the government, then global demand slowed, the giants continued to increase supply, the price of iron ore fell, the companies made less profit but them increasing supply (coupled with falling commodity prices) also pressured the smaller miners, thus the giants are growing their market share, but government still needs more cash, there is no capital gains tax being paid of share profits because the stock prices of the major iron ore companies are the same as 5 years ago, thus shareholder return is poor, but hundreds of employees are making more than $400,000 per year.

It’s important to keep the gravy train going by any means you can, whether you manage to dupe government, the economy or shareholders.

Yet they still are on the look out for federal government help to assist them with their plight of iron ore prices being below their cost of production.

WTF?

How To Go From Sinophile to Sinophobia – Ask Australia

A country’s Foreign Affairs  isn’t only about setting policy but you need to understand economics in order to achieve your diplomatic objective.

Having a few politicians who are certified Sinophiles isn’t an automatic pass either.

Unfortunately, politicians and their advisors often aren’t financially literate let alone considered to be business people and because of this, they fail to understand how to deal with other countries over the length of many economic cycles.

In Australia’s case, it was the only large developed economy to survive the 2008 Global Financial Crisis. The fact that it has hasn’t posted a year with negative economic growth for 22 years in another anomaly.

Over the past 10 years, Australia’s economy benefitted from China’s appetite for its commodity resources (see China’s stimulus) and we loved them for it but after a while Aussies weren’t happy with what panned out, as the social and financial divide was then blamed on a “Two-Speed” economy.

When a large trading partner saves your economy, you say “Thank You”.

You don’t;

  1. antagonise them by placing U.S. Marines in Darwin and lie about the real reason they are there.
  2. call them dirty polluters (even though you have been one for a 100 years before them)
  3. revile the fact that their students come to Australia to study and “take away places from Aussie students”.
  4. ban their large telecomm networking company from participating in the construction of your own National Broadband Network
  5. obstruct and oppose their companies from buying assets (farms) from a willing seller in a free market enterprise system &
  6. charge their citizens more tax if they choose to buy property in Australia.

Oh Australia, you just don’t get it.

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